Boat Diving Survival Guide

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The Art of Equipment Configuration

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1. Accessibility:

The single most important concept in scuba equipment configuration is accessibility. A diver should be able to deploy, use, and stow dive gear easily and efficiently. Any configuration that makes accessing a piece of dive gear difficult or complicated should be re-thought, even if it fulfils all the other tenets of optimized equipment placement. Whenever possible, configure all dive gear so that it may be deployed and operated with one hand. This ensures that a diver can use his other hand for emergency management, such as maintaining physical contact with an out-of-air buddy.

2. Durability:

The manner in which a diver configures his gear should ensure that it will stay in place for an entire dive. A common equipment configuration failure is the alternate air source regulator coming free of its quick release.  The first time a piece of gear comes loose, the diver should reconfigure his gear to prevent the problem from reoccurring.

If it happened once, it will happen again!

3. Streamlining:

All dive gear, including accessories and hoses should be streamlined. In no circumstance should a piece of dive gear dangle more than a few inches below a diver’s horizontal body line . Hoses should be adjusted so that they do not loop above or beside the diver. Keep in mind that regulator hoses are available in a variety of lengths. Proper streamlining reduces the chance of entanglement, damage to the environment, and drag.

A common failure of streamlining in standard recreational scuba diving is the octopus-style alternate air source, which necessarily must be attached to a longer hose to facilitate donation to an out-of-air diver. The hoses on octopus-style regulators typically loop out to the side of the diver, presenting an entanglement hazard and creating drag. As far as streamlining goes, integrated alternate air sources and long hose/necklace regulator configurations are both preferable.

All types of diving require some level of redundancy in the gear. Recreational open water diving requires that a diver carry at least one redundant second stage for his buddy to use in an emergency. More advanced or technical types of diving may require additional redundant gear for safety. A diver should carry the minimum amount of accessories and gear that allows him to dive safely. At a certain point, additional gear no longer increases dive safety. The trick is to balance redundancy and simplicity when configuring dive gear.

5. Trim and Comfort:

Once a diver has optimized his equipment configuration, he should test it in a forgiving environment such as a pool or shallow water dive site. When evaluating changes to his gear configuration, a diver should notice whether the changes upset or improve his trim and whether or not position of the gear is comfortable. No matter how fantastic it seems on the surface, the final test of an equipment configuration is whether or not it is comfortable and functional underwater.

Evaluating and adjusting your scuba diving equipment configuration can make diving easier, safer, and more comfortable.