“Save a Dive” Kit

SaveaDiveKit

 

Save a dive kits may be a small as a zip-lock bag or as big as a tool box, a diver’s save a dive kit will differ depending upon his needs and type of diving.

Suggested parts for the Basic Save a Dive Kit:

Spare mask strap
Mask straps are one of the most common items to break before a dive. Be sure to select a spare mask strap that fits your mask.

Spare fin strap and buckle
Fin straps break less frequently than mask straps, but they do break.  Be sure to choose the correct strap for you fins.

Spare regulator mouthpiece and zip tie/cable tie to secure it.

A spare regulator mouthpiece is an absolute essential.

Basic o-ring kit
This should include o-rings for low pressure and high pressure hoses, as well as o-rings for yoke tank valves or o-rings for DIN regulators (depending upon which you use).

High pressure and low pressure port plugs for the regulator first stage.

When a diver removes a hose from his regulator first stage, he must plug the hole with a port plug. Bring along both a high pressure and low pressure port plug that fits your first stage (apex first stages have unusually large port plugs).

Small adjustable crescent wrench
This is used to remove hoses from the regulator to replace o-rings.

Hex wrenches/ allen keys
Hex wrenches are used to remove port plugs, as well as for a variety of other applications.

Cutting device/knife
At a minimum, your cutting tool should be able to cleanly slice off zip ties and snip strings and bungee.

Needle nose pliers
Needle nose pliers are great for just about everything that needs to be pulled or tightened.

Small pot of silicon lubricant

This is used for greasing o-rings in dive gear, dive lights, etc.

A lighter

Zip ties and duct tape

Nail clippers

Nail clippers are useful for nipping of zip ties and clipping small items.

White trash bag.
Use a white plastic trash bag as a work surface on dirty or wet areas. This makes seeing o-rings and parts easier, and keeps them clean and dry.

Dry suit zipper wax.

Essential if you use a dry suit.

A DIN-to-yoke or yoke-to-DIN adaptor

This allows you to dive with both DIN and yoke tanks.

• Bungee/ Shock Cord

Bungee can be used to secure lights, create necklaces for back-up regs (long hose configuration), manufacture watch/computer straps, and create octopus/alternate air source holders.

 

 

 

Do I Need to Be a Good Swimmer to Scuba Dive?

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Participation in a high school swim team is not a prerequisite for scuba certification. Scuba certification swim tests are not timed, and participants can use whatever swimming stroke they desire to pass the test – even goofy ones.

Should All Scuba Divers Be Able to Swim?

This is certainly an interesting question.

People enrol in scuba courses for a variety of reasons. Some state that they want to learn to dive in order to overcome a fear of the water or to learn to swim. I would urge such people to become comfortable in the water by enrolling in swimming courses before ever considering a scuba experience program or entry-level certification.

Diver Confidence:Swim1

While the technique of swimming underwater in scuba gear is very different from the technique of swimming on the surface without equipment, confidence in oneself and one’s abilities in the water does translate to diving.

In many cases, this confidence and ability appear to be directly correlated with a student’s comfort level when scuba diving. Students who are completely certain that they would be able to survive in the water with out scuba gear are certainly much more comfortable using it.

• Basic Diving Skills:

Consider that even a scuba program that does not include a swim test will still require the student to put water in his mask and to remove a regulator underwater.

Students who are afraid of having water in their faces will not enjoy these skills, and would do better to increase their comfort level in the water before attempting to dive.

• Problem Solving:

Scuba diving is an equipment dependent activity, and the reliability of the equipment is extremely high.

However, the remote possibility exists that a diver will need to deal with an equipment-related issue by using emergency management skills such as switching to another regulator, even during an initial dive experience.

Scuba divers do not need to be expert swimmers, but a basic ability to handle oneself in the water without fear or stress is an absolute requirement in my opinion.

Knowing how to swim and float are a huge step in acquiring that confidence. Prospective divers who do not have the ability to stay calm on the surface without a floatation device or who cannot swim (however sloppily) for a short distance should first learn these skills with a professional swimming coach.

A diver who is not confident without his gear is one uncomfortable situation away from panic, and panic, as all scuba divers know, endangers both the person panicking and those around him.

Although knowing how to swim is not required for basic scuba experience programs, it is advisable.

COELACANTH DIVER DIES IN TRAGIC ACCIDENT BY SARAH KEARTES JUNE 21 2014

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It is with heavy hearts that we say goodbye to Peter Timm, a legendary South African underwater explorer who played a part in one of the most extraordinary animal rediscoveries of our time.

Timm, 51, and his diving partner Adele Stegan, 45, died on Wednesday after aborting a dive at 60 metres near a reef known as Aliwal Shoal on South Africa’s eastern coast. Just what caused the pair to surface too quickly remains a mystery, but experts suggest that decompression sickness (DCS) is to blame for their deaths. Adele1

The diving legend worked closely with Earth Touch on our production of Dinofish, a National Geographic co-production about the rediscovery of the coelacanth – a fish long thought to have gone extinct with the dinosaurs. He was the first person to see the ancient creature in its natural habitat.

“Peter was hardcore – not just in appearance and stature, but in his resolute passion for the ocean, deep-water exploration and the coelacanth,” Earth Touch producer Ben Hewett said.
“In the short and memorable time I spent with Peter, it was clear that his first coelacanth sighting left an eternal impression on him,” Hewett said. “Peter would talk about them and treat them with the same love and loyalty as he would a family member … I think to Peter they were part of his family. He would risk life and limb to spend time with these magical creatures. Our documentary would not have been possible without his amazing experience, unquestionable expertise and steel determination.”

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